The Caper Spurge Fairy… finished.

And another Fairy spreads her wings… I suspect she may squeak a bit as she flies, in her all-over latex outfit, but, given the dangers of this particular genus of plants, this is a small price to pay for the safety of inhabiting the Caper Spurge. The trouble with Euphorbias is their sap, which is not only toxic, but can cause severe skin reaction and damage to eyes, which explains why my fairy is wearing goggles, too. I have this plant growing here and there in my garden, and it readily oozes toxic sap at the least damage. So I…

The Caper Spurge Fairy: after washing off the under-painting

Painting the Caper Spurge Fairy, part 2

The Caper Spurge Fairy is beginning to come to life…. Ok, so when I said there wouldn’t be a huge range of colour in this painting, I think I was forgetting a few things… like the fact that I tend to just layer on washes of colour because it’s fun and not because it’s actually the right colour 🙂 So I have begun the ‘colouring-in’ stage of this painting: Having first done the shading part of the under-painting (see previous post), I am adding a basic colour on top. Most of this layer of paint ends up being washed off, but…

Painting the Caper Spurge Fairy

And another poison flower fairy begins to emerge! This one is Euphorbia Lathyris, fairy of the Caper Spurge. I have (probably) finished the blue under-painting stage now, and unlike the last painting this one is definitely going to be in colour… Not a huge range of colour, I must admit: the Caper Spurge is basically green all over – no coloured flowers – and given the toxic effects of this plant the poor fairy has to wear an all-in-one latex outfit, which will probably be black. I shall, however, give her pink rubber gloves, I think! For a little more…

The 'capers' of the Caper Spurge - no, you cannot eat them

Sketches for the Poison Flower Fairies: the very kinky latex-clad fairy of the Caper Spurge

The last Poison Flower Fairy in my current collection (I have more possibilities, but I’m temporarily forced to break off from this macabre lot to get on with some other stuff)… the last one is a member of the Euphorbia genus. I had to include a Euphorbia, not because they are the most famous of poison plants, though they are undoubtedly poisonous, but because it was a Euphorbia-related visit to casualty which first gave me the idea for these paintings. So, there are these plants: Euphorbias, also known as Spurges, a vast genus of plants, wildly varying, including some very…